How to Choose Siding for Your New Home

How to Choose Siding for Your New Home

Choosing siding for your new home or updating siding at your current residence is an important decision. Several factors determine what kind of siding you choose. Read more to learn about some common issues that affect a homeowner’s choices for home siding installation.

Cost

The initial cost of siding installation is critical because you don’t want to commit to a project that is outside of your budget. Some of the more expensive siding choices include brick and stone, which require costly materials and installation procedures. If you’re trying to save money, vinyl siding installation costs and fiber cement siding costs are cheaper alternatives to more expensive options.

Maintenance

Some types of siding require regular maintenance to keep up their appearance. Wood siding is especially vulnerable to changes in weather and requires preparation for winter as well as regular coats of paint and caulking. This can be a lot of work for the homeowner, and you should be prepared to invest time and money if you choose wood siding. If you’re looking for an easier option that requires less upkeep, try vinyl or brick siding. Vinyl siding is low maintenance because it doesn’t require painting and is water resistant. It’s also cheaper than other types of siding. If you choose brick siding, expect to wash it a few times a year, but otherwise it’s maintenance requirements are minimal.

Durability

When considering house siding installation options, consider the lifetime of various types. Vinyl siding can last up to 40 years, which can be valuable if you don’t want to replace the siding often. Brick and stone siding will usually last the lifetime of the home, but this benefit is partially offset by the cost of siding installation. Wood siding can last from 10 to 100 years, and its durability is highly dependent on how well it is maintained.

Aesthetics

This is the first thing many people consider when they are choosing siding for their home. Think about the architecture and style of your home, and from there you can choose what siding complements it. Cottage and bungalow homes look good with wood siding, brick is often used for colonial style homes, and stucco suits a Mediterranean theme. Vinyl siding is common and will allow your home to blend in, while stone adds texture and will add a unique appeal to your property. Make sure to check for any requirements in your neighborhood that may restrict what types of siding you are allowed to install.

Resale Value

This is closely connected with durability and the initial cost of siding installation. If you invest now you will likely see a greater return when you sell your home.

Staff Writer (2014 November 11) How to Choose Siding for Your New Home. Retrieved on November 17, 2014 from housekillers.com

How to Identify Hail Damage

You may think that just because you can’t see any signs of damage, or because your roof isn’t leaking, you don’t have damage. Remember, hail damage can be particularly difficult to identify and many homeowners discover major roofing damage years down the road, after it’s too late to file a storm damage claim with their insurance company. If you have any reason to suspect hail damage after a storm, you should have a full property damage inspection performed by a reputable contractor, right away.

Roof Hail Damage – Roofs are the most commonly damaged part of a home or business in hailstorms. A damaged shingle may allow water to seep through the roof causing additional damage to the roof deck, support structure, interior walls, or windows, and can cause leaking, staining on walls and flooding inside your home. Leaking roofs lead to costly damages and many insurance policies have strict time limits on submitting claims after hailstorms, so it’s in your best interest to act fast after hailstorms and start the repairs process, if necessary.

Asphalt Shingle Damage: On an asphalt roof, hail damage looks like a dark spot, or bruise, where the roofing granules have been knocked away (look in gutters for accumulation of granules). In some cases you may find holes, cracking, or missing shingles on roofs with hail damage. This can result in leaking and serious water damage, which can lead to mold formation and wood rot, which can compromise the structural integrity of your roof resulting in collapse. In severe wind storms, it is common for shingles or sections of the roof to be missing altogether.

Other Types of Shingle Damage: Shake (wood), metal, tile, and slate roof shingles can all suffer damage from hailstorms. Due to the materials, each type of shingle shows unique signs of damage from hail. If shingles are cracked, missing, torn or split at seams, you should definitely have a damage inspection performed. Similarly, if you notice leaking inside your home after a hailstorm, get an inspection right away.

More about Shingle Damage

Siding Damage often results from wind-driven hail. The three most common signs of damage to siding are cracking, chipping and holes. Read more about siding damage here.

Window Damage is similar to siding damage, but usually more obvious to identify. Wind-driven hail can strike windows and break the glass itself, or cause damage to the seals on windows. Read more about window damage here.

Exterior Appliances can also sustain damage in hailstorms. Denting and intake of excessive amounts of water often affect AC / HVAC units after severe hail. Read more about exterior appliance damage here.

How to Repair Hail Damage

Hail damage can be very difficult to detect and often occurs to roofs, siding and windows, all of which are difficult DIY repair projects that could void your homeowners insurance or manufacturer warranty, if not performed by a licensed contractor. Due to the risks associated with hail damage, it is recommended to cut to the chase and have a storm damage repair contractor inspect your damages right away.

Staff Writer (2014 November) How to Identify Hail Damage. Retrieved on November 17, 2014 from the National Storm Damage Center